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Engagio, Brandon Redlinger – The Top 50 Women in Revenue That You Should Know

Engagio, Brandon Redlinger – The Top 50 Women in Revenue That You Should Know

There’s no shortage of talented women in business, yet the revenue side of a company has historically been dominated by men.

Data from the CEB reveals that women represent only 30 percent of first- and mid-level sales management roles, and 20 percent of department head or general manager type roles. A report from CNN claims that only 14.2 percent of the top five leadership positions at the companies in the S&P 500 are held by women.

I want to take this opportunity to recognize some of the smartest, most progressive, and hardest-working women in revenue roles, from sales and marketing to CEOs and founders. We’ve had many conversations with coworkers and colleagues in the industry, and have come up with a list of 50+ women in revenue that you should know.

Why should you know them? These are women who don’t manage, they lead. They don’t preach, they execute. They don’t watch, they act. They are today’s leaders, and we can learn a lot from them.

Below is our list of 50+ powerful women in revenue along with some meaningful quotes and words of inspiration. This list is by no means comprehensive – rather it’s just a good start at recognizing some of the women that make the business we run great.

If you know anyone that deserves to be on this list, let us know in the comments below.

So, without further adieu, here are the people you should know!

Gretchen DeKnikker
COO, SaaStr

Kristina McMillan
Sales Development Practice Leader, TOPO

Heidi Bullock
Soon to be CMO, Engagio

Dayna Rothman
VP of Marketing, BrightFunnel

Christelle Flahaux
VP of Marketing, Domo, Inc.

Whitney Bouck
COO, HelloSign

Maria Pergolino
SVP Marketing & Sales Development, Apttus
Understanding an evolving sector isn’t gender-specific, but personally I enjoy the fast-paced nature of the tech sphere. As long as you’re placing the needs of your customers and organization first, you’re free to employ new strategies, tactics, and create the kind of strong internal bonds that lead to lasting success.
-Maria Pergolino

Hana Abaza
Head of Marketing, Shopify

Danielle Herzberg
Formerly of Hubspot & Airbnb

Eileen Wiens
VP of Emerging & SMB Sales, Intacct

Jill Rowley
Author, speaker, advisor

Samantha McKenna
Sr. Director of Sales, ON24

Jean Tali
VP of Sales, Mindflash

Ada Chen Rekhi
Founder & COO, NoteJoy

Trish Bertuzzi
President & Chief Strategist, The Bridge Group

The rules of success for achieving as a salesperson are no different for a man than they are for a woman. The #1 tip I would tell anyone moving into the sales profession is to set goals for yourself that are outside of your quota and make sure one of them is perfecting your craft. If you rely solely on your company to provide you with the skills that you need you will be sorely disappointed. You own the success of you.
-Trish Bertuzzi

Caitlin Henehan
VP and GM, Zendesk

Meagen Eisenberg
CMO, MongoDB

Nadia Rashid
Area Vice President of Sales, Marketo

Susan Zuzic
VP of Sales, Oracle Marketing Cloud

Jenny Coupe
VP of Customer Acquisition, SOASTA

Frannie Danzinger
VP of Strategic Business Development, Integrate

Wynne Brown
Director of Customer Success, Seal Software

Shari Johnson
SVP of Marketing, Radius Intelligence

I was naturally drawn to be a part of a culture that was at the heart of changing the world on how we communicate and interact. With this space being so heavily male-dominated, I do feel as a woman, I am able to add balance, in ways that don’t come naturally to men, that as a generalization focuses on how the technology itself rather than the humans using it. By moving the corporate story to customer storytelling instead of stats, putting our customers and users first rather than our products and cultivating relationships with our customers at a deeper level, I feel women have this unique capability that the tech space should embrace.
-Shari Johnson

Danielle Morrill
CEO & Cofounder, Mattermark

Ruzwana Bashir
CEO & Cofounder, Peek

Leela Srinivasan
CMO, Lever

Leah Busque
Founder, TaskRabbit

Falon Fatemi
CEO & Founder, Node.io

Nancy Duarte
Principal, Duarte Design

Katie Bullard
CMO, DiscoverOrg

A successful leader – whether a man or a woman – has to possess high IQ and high EQ (emotional intelligence), and it’s been my experience that woman are often better equipped to tap into both the rational and emotional motivations of their teams. For instance, when change happens rapidly (like it does in martech), resistance is bound to occur, and the only way to engage and get buy-in from teams is to understand the rational and emotional reasons for that resistance and then to actively address both as you move the organization forward. Understanding and acknowledging the importance of a high EQ makes you better able to handle the conflict and stress that never fails to occur in this space, and it’s been a conscious focus of mine as I’ve navigated through my career.
-Katie Bullard

Luanne Dauber
CMO, Confluent

Morag Lucey
CMO, Avaya

Megan Lueders Megan Lueders
VP of Marketing, Zenoss

Rhonda Shantz Rhonda Shantz
CMO, Centrify

Leah Groski Leah Groski
Sr. Manager, Demand Generation, CoreOS

Kathleen Hayes Kathleen Hayes
VP of Marketing, LightBend

Emmanuelle Skala Emmanuelle Skala
VP of Sales and Customer Success, Digital Ocean

Don’t wait to speak up until you have all the answers. No one wants to be wrong – but women tend to care about this more than men. Women will hold back until they are 100% certain while men are ok with tossing out some hypothesis and guesses. This leaves you out of the conversation. Don’t wait until you have all the facts – your judgement and instinct are your assets so use them.
-Emmanuella Skala

Lena Shaw Lena Shaw
Director of Marketing and Growth, LeadGenius

Patrice Green Patrice Greene
President, Inverta

Maneeza Aminy
CEO, Marvel Marketers

Anneke Selley Anneke Selley
CEO & Founder, Reality Works

Lesley Young Lesley Young
Global SVP, Box

Alexis Johnson Alexis Johnson
VP, Customer Operations, Interana

Lauren Vaccarello Lauren Vaccarello
VP of Marketing, Box

Jen Spencer Jen Spencer
VP of Sales and Marketing, Allbound

When you’re the only female in a boardroom of gray slacks and light blue dress shirts, people remember you. And, when you’re immediately discounted upon arrival and then you’re the first person to actually say something interesting, people remember you. That’s my unique advantage.
-Jen Spencer

Megan Heuer Megan Heuer
VP of Research, SiriusDecisions

Tracy Eiler Tracy Eiler
CMO, InsideView

Kristen Wendel Kristen Wendel
Director of Marketing Operations, VersionOne

Andrea Austin Andrea Austin
VP Enterprise Business, InsideView

Carolyn Betts Carolyn Betts
Founder & CEO, Betts Recruiting

Bridget Gleason Bridget Gleason
VP of Sales, Logz.io

Be both confident and curious. Many studies have shown that women feel the need to ‘check all the boxes’ before applying for a job or taking on a new challenge. Men don’t have that same inclination. In order to lead, a woman must exude confidence, and be comfortable with the fact that she might not have all the answers and that mistakes and failure are part of the package. Equally important is the quality of curiosity. Curiosity strengthens relationships. It fosters agile thinking. It facilitates deeper insights.
-Bridget Gleason

If you know a women leaders in revenue who belongs on this list, give them a shoutout in the comments!

keith