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Best Practices

A 'how-to' live event webcasting guide—part 2 of 2

With the business case made, we can look to the "how" of live event webcasting. While it requires some preparation, setup is probably even easier than you think. Here’s what you’ll need for the most common live event setups: For a single speaker, with a live audience, such as a CEO address – One camera, two lights and just a few key personnel are required. For a "fireside chat" and informal engagement with employees – using a very similar setup to the single-speaker event but with a tablet or laptop computer for the presenters to answer questions and interact with the audience For a panel discussion, with a live audience – The setup can include multiple cameras, several lights, some microphones and live...

With the business case made, ...

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The business case for live event webcasting—part 1 of 2

Live event webcasting can bring an amazing sense of immediacy and importance to corporate events. Webcasting your live events is a highly appropriate way to deliver to a broader audience numerous types of corporate and organizational happenings, including: Keynote Presentations Panel Discussions Ballroom Plenary Sessions Live events allow you to originate your broadcast from a company campus, a boardroom, a trade show or from multiple company locations. Called "multi-site" meetings, they can incorporate HD videoconferences, telepresence meetings and even connected desktop webcams. While the possibilities are nearly limitless, common characteristics of live events are that they occur on-location and often incorporate an audience at the venue. The rationale for delivering live events via webcast is simple – ROI! Here are some key ways that live...

Live event webcasting can br...

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Webcast video lighting – critical and too often overlooked

It does not matter if your camera is the latest 4K CMOS wonder or analog standard definition, unless you pay attention to lighting your subject, the image quality will be poor. With a little effort, your webcast video quality can improve dramatically through attention to studio lighting. 1. Use the three-light (at least) approach. This means a key light (the brightest) from the left or right side of the subject, a fill light from the opposite side, and a back light to separate the subject from the background and give your shot depth. The fill light should be about the 1/3 the intensity of the key light. 2. Use uniform light color temperature. Too often we see mixed lighting out there, and...

It does not matter if your cam...

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Improving Communication for Your Business Through Technology

When you outline the biggest challenges facing your business today, having the right technology for communications is probably not the top item on your list. But along with making sure you have an effective communication style (more on that in this earlier post), choosing the right technology really should be a top priority. An organization that does not effectively communicate -- to its customers, prospects, employees, partners and vendors -- will likely not survive. In a world filled with a barrage of constant communication through social media, newsletters, emails and text messages, every business must find a way to cut through the clutter and get their message across loud and clear with the right technology. Effective communication must start within the...

When you outline the bigges...

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Take the Complexity Out of Studio Video – Part 2

In our last installment, we covered why video – and why studio video in particular – makes sense for both live and on-demand webcasts.Your organization’s quality image is heavily dependent on careful pre-production preparation, combined with the studio facility you choose. In this installment of our blog series, we'll explore how to make the most of your studio time by designing a show format that works for your audience, as well as how to make the most of your talent and drive ROI for studio video. A key consideration is format – it is typically helpful to think of your studio webcast like a TV show. For inspiration, look to TV programs that you like –...

In our last installment, we co...

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Take the Complexity Out of Studio Video – Part 1

Here are some revealing statistics about video: 89 million people in the United States are going to watch 1.2 billion online videos today (ComScore) Only about 26 percent of national brands are using online video to market to consumers (Kantar Media) 76 percent of marketers plan to add video to their sites, making it a higher priority than Facebook, Twitter and blog integration (Social Media Examiner)So, with these numbers in mind, it makes total sense to incorporate video into your webinars – video means engagement, and quality content and a professional-looking presentation...

Here are...

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How to build your own webcam studio – and other helpful video webcasting tips

More and more of our customers are adding video to their webinars – making webinars more engaging and informative than ever before. In some cases, like large executive events, it may be necessary to have a professional studio and crew. But broadcast quality video can be costly – and for most webcast applications, it simply isn’t necessary. By properly using inexpensive and readily available equipment, you can build your own webcam studio and achieve outstanding results. Here's are some video webcasting tips to get you started: Find a dedicated location: Not much space is required, and a spare office or conference room should provide plenty of area to set up lights and video gear. Ideally, you will find a location where you...

More and more of our customers...

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Do your webinars ROCK?

When I was 12 years old, I went to my first rock concert. My friends and I convinced an unsuspecting parent to take us to see the rock band KISS at the height of their popularity—yeah, I know, that was a long time ago. The show was a spectacle beyond my wildest imagination. There was fire breathing, smoking guitars, flames, lights, hydraulic stage risers and, of course, the crazy make-up. This was theater on the grandest scale. It also set a ridiculously high bar for future concerts. Many years later, I am still affected by that show. Any time I attend a concert by an artist who stands around singing songs without any pomp and circumstance, I start to get bored...

When I was 12 years old, I wen...

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What? I can’t hear you.

As the primary webinar presenter for a webinar company, I spend a lot of time thinking about, preparing and delivering webinars. It is literally my job to talk about webinar best practices, and every time I give a webinar, I learn something new. However, last week I was listening to someone else’s webinar, and I was reminded that it’s often the simplest things that can completely derail what could have been a successful event. The webinar in question was delivered by a great organization that gives a lot of really informative webinars (company name removed to protect the innocent). This particular presentation was going to discuss some interesting topics that I was really looking forward to hearing about. The problem was...

As the primary webinar present...

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